Another Word…by Gus Keiser

November 13, 2017

Do everything without complaining or arguing, so that you may become blameless and pure, children of God without fault in a crooked and depraved generation in which you shine like stars in the universe as you hold out the word of life.

                                                                                                                       Philippians 2: 14-16

It took place while two women were waiting in the serving line at a wedding reception. The one turned to the other and remarked, “It’s in our nature to critique, isn’t it?”  The statement stopped the conversation in mid-sentence as the other women just stood there not quite knowing what to say.  Their conversation seemed benign enough as they discussed how the serving line could move a little more smoothly, had it been placed in a better location.  It was merely one person’s observation, so the women thought; however, the gentle and well-meaning reprimand managed to catch the critiquing women’s attention.

In our human quest for excellence, we’ve managed to identify the areas with what we perceive as having the greatest weakness in our world and are quick with solutions as to how to improve upon them. It’s true in the workplace, in the halls of academia, in the sporting arena, the fine arts and…even in the church.  Excellence is our goal and some of us have managed to hone this to a fine art while striving diligently to reach it.  Ultimately, there’s nothing wrong with striving for excellence, but in our quest of it, we too often confuse critique with criticism.  Webster makes this differentiation: to critique someone or something is to offer a critical analysis or overview. It looks at the whole picture, encompassing strengths, weaknesses, purpose and other effectiveness.  Criticism, on the other hand, is the act of making a judgment, or to find fault.

Paul, when writing to the church in Philippi, urged his readers to do everything without complaining or arguing. Was he seeking to keep the peace so that everyone would get along?  No!  His purpose was much higher.  Check out his reasoning: “…so that you may become blameless and pure, children of God without fault in a crooked and depraved generation in which you shine like stars in the universe as you hold out the word of life.”

 This whole issue of the difference between critique and criticism is a bit touchy. Paul admonishes us to stop complaining so that we can become blameless and pure.  Wow!  What a great concept!  We can choose to be critical…complaining and looking just like the crooked and depraved generation in which we live…or we can choose to stop arguing or complaining and shine like the stars in the universe while holding out the word of life.  The choice seems simple enough, doesn’t it?  But in reality, it’s not all that easy.  It takes a lot of self-discipline and self-evaluation to keep critiquing from becoming complaining, but it’s something we can do!  Today, why not make it your goal to stay away from complaining while lifting up the lives of those around you as fellow children of God!

Lord of Love; guard our minds and our tongues as we strive to treat others with the same respect and love with which you treat us. Amen.

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